I was too young to remember it, but my family lived in Pratt in 1967-68 on Commodore Street. My dad worked as a salesman for Burroughs Corporation back then, having transferred to town from Wichita. He was at the top of his game back in '67, he told me recently, and was quickly moving up [...]

I was too young to remember it, but my family lived in Pratt in 1967-68 on Commodore Street. My dad worked as a salesman for Burroughs Corporation back then, having transferred to town from Wichita. He was at the top of his game back in '67, he told me recently, and was quickly moving up the ladder of that now-defunct corporation. He knew this would mean that he would eventually have to transfer to a big city, and he didn't want to raise his children in such an environment.
We lived in Pratt for almost a year, and here are some of my parents' memories from those days.
My mother recalls a 'welcome lady' that welcomed our family to town.
My father remembers Gaedeke's Bakery fondly. It was located south of downtown on the west side. 'It was a Swedish bakery, and your mom dearly loved it,' he said, adding that he also was a frequent visitor to the bakery while we lived here. 'I remember their fantastic, fantastic bakery products,' my mother told me.
My father recalls visiting Schafer Plow to promote Burroughs office products. 'I asked the secretary to see the office manager and then asked his name. She replied, 'Mr. Stubblefield.' He said he had a hard time keeping a straight face as he thought about how the then-manager's name fit his occupation.
My mother said our family had only one car in those days, so when my father was out of town during the week on business trips, she would sometimes pull me around town in a little red wagon for a change of scenery.
In Christmas 1967, my father said, 'we had a real Christmas tree. We also had shag carpet in our rental home. When the needles came out of that tree, I didn't ever think we were going to get the needles out of that carpet.'
In 1968, my father found employment with Alfalfa County Rural Electric Association in Cherokee, Oklahoma, and that's where I grew up.