Jodie Grant, Operations Supervisor at Mercy Hospital Columbus, wins inauguratory award for charism

JOPLIN, Mo. – Six dedicated co-workers recently were honored for living the mission of Mercy by receiving values awards.

The recipients:

· Kristen Crawford, a registered nurse in the Mercy Hospital Joplin emergency department, for dignity

· Megan Haddock, in environmental services at Mercy Hospital Carthage, for stewardship

· Amanda Hunter, a diabetes nurse practitioner for Mercy Clinic Endocrinology in Joplin, for justice

· Dr. Russ Kennedy at Mercy Clinic Family Medicine – Stone’s Corner in Webb City, for excellence

· Jill Overman, a quality improvement nurse in Joplin, for service

· Jodie Grant, operations supervisor at Mercy Hospital Columbus, for charism

“These co-workers are examples of what we strive to be in our daily walk at Mercy,” said Tim Murphy, executive director of human resources for Mercy in Joplin. “That we could narrow it down to six people is remarkable.”

Dignity: Kristen Crawford. According to a nomination, she treats every person she encounters with tender care. From the lonely, old man who has no one to care for him to the drunken and homeless, each person is handled as a person of value. She is a wonderful example of how a confident, engaging life can make a difference to many people.

Stewardship: Megan Haddock. She demonstrates the most valuable and sincere connection between ministry and work. She had multiple nominations that echoed the same sentiment of “mission,” which is how she describes her job. She talks to others in her department about how cleaning rooms for the ill and serving others in the most basic ways is a powerful and important ministry. Her reward is the comfort of others.

Justice: Amanda Hunter. She was Mercy Joplin’s first diabetes bridge nurse while a nurse and is the first diabetes ambassador as a nurse practitioner. In her nominations, comments were about her compassion to the poor, being a patient teacher and mentor, and being an all-around catalyst for positive change for patients and for Mercy. She has an extraordinary bias for those who are vulnerable and an amazing commitment to creating solutions for those in need.

Excellence: Russ Kennedy. He is chairmen of southwest Missouri’s Mercy Clinic Board and was nominated by one of his patients. Like most of his patients, she thinks he walks on water. For those lucky enough to be in his care, they are well aware of his sincere listening and attentive response. He is a highly sought-after physician because he is very good at what he does.

Service: Jill Overman. To be a recipient of the Service Award, one must demonstrate one of the most difficult of human characteristics: other-centered behavior. One testimony to her worthiness is the long list of volunteerism works that her nominator provided. Even when she is on her own time, she takes on the duty of a servant heart and strives to understand what is needed around her so that she might busy herself in reply.

Charism: Jodie Grant. This is the first year for this award. Mercy’s values combined with its charism create the way the ministry make decisions, acts and serves patients. She has a capacity to bring to bear all of the aspects of ministry into caring for others. Her nomination reads like a list of the spiritual assets that Mercy seeks for delivering care: creative, kind, willing to go far beyond the job description, astute at identifying issues and fearless in engaging new opportunities.

Mercy, named one of the top five large U.S. health systems in 2017 by Truven, an IBM Watson Health company, serves millions annually. Mercy includes 44 acute care and specialty (heart, children’s, orthopedic and rehab) hospitals, more than 700 physician practices and outpatient facilities, 40,000 co-workers and more than 2,000 Mercy Clinic physicians in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma. Mercy also has outreach ministries in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas.